Tesla Powerwall 2 battery storage

section-powerwall_solution

How long will Tesla Powerwall last?
Batteries like Tesla Powerwall are warrantied for ten years. As home battery storage is relatively new to the market there is little evidence about what will happen after the ten years. However, it is highly unlikely that all the batteries will stop functioning dead on ten years. We expect the batteries to function for at least a couple of years after the warranty period and possibly as much as 20 years.
It’s not a great analogy but you wouldn’t buy a laptop with a one year warranty and expect to replace it after the first year.  However, with solar systems expected to last at least 25 years, it would be prudent to factor in one battery replacement during the  system lifetime.
Judging by the pace of battery innovation, the price, technology and warranties of batteries in 10–20 years’ time is clearly going to improve. A maintenance kitty of £2,500 for battery and inverter replacement after ten years seems more than sufficient. There is also the exciting prospect of getting a sweet new battery after ten years.
Do the economics of solar and battery storage still make sense?
How does this extra cost affect the economic case for solar and batteries?
With the current Feed in Tariff (FiT) the payback periods for solar range from 12–18 years. The 12 years would be an optimal, south facing roof big enough to support around 16 panels.
With a battery, we can increase the selfconsumption of solar energy from around 30% to 75% and improve the payback slightly. However, if we add battery and inverter replacement costs the payback would extend to 14–20 years.
In conclusion, if you factor in battery replacement you have a system with a minimum 20 years’ lifetime, which more than pays for its self. Not only will you be generating and using your own renewable energy, it will be cheaper than buying it from the grid and even provide a profit.

Powerwall 2 DC coupled More than double the storage capacity (13.5 kWh) of Powerwall Well oversized for a typical UK house with 4 kW installation
Higher power output (7 kW peak and 5 kW continuous) Power limited by the main solar inverter. If it’s a G83 inverter then the max power will be 3.68 kW
More cost effective than the AC setup—will not require a second inverter
Potential to be better for larger solar arrays (around 10 kW)
More compact—20 cm shorter than Powerwall
Can be ground mounted
AC coupled More potential for grid balancing services and additional revenue streams in the future
G59 Grid application may rule out a lot of systems e.g. 4.5 kWp + 7 kWp = 11.5 kWp potential total output to the grid
Power not limited by the solar inverter Potential grid connection charges and witness testing

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